Phoenix Canstruction 2017 Recap

Every year St. Mary’s Food Bank gets a huge donation of food from architects, engineers, contractors, design firms, and design students who all participate in Phoenix Canstruction. Phoenix Canstruction is an amazing event, hosted by the Society for Marketing Professional Services, that invites teams to get creative and make structures entirely out of canned goods!

51,000 lbs. donated!

From dump trucks to tractors and Mr. T to Mario, these teams took up to seven hours to create some incredible structures all while helping provide food for people in need. Last year, Phoenix Canstruction helped donate 47,000 pounds of food to St. Mary’s Food Bank. This year they bested their high score and donated 51,000 pounds of food!

The structures that were built are still on display for the public to see at the Phoenix Convention Center until August 12th (appropriately named “Decanstruction Day”).

Holding ourselves to a high standard, we still have a goal to be able to distribute 125 million pounds of food by 2021. With amazing events like Phoenix Canstruction we will consistently strive to make sure that our communities are growing and we are truly fighting hunger. St. Mary’s Food Bank thanks the Phoenix Canstruction teams and the Society for Marketing Professional Services for helping donate 51,000 pounds of food and for putting on an amazing event. We can’t wait to see what you have in store for us next year!

Want to see more of these magnificent structures? Click HERE to check out the Canstruction Facebook page.

Phoenix Canstruction 2017 Recap 1
Phoenix Canstruction 2017 Recap 2

DISCOVER Card Employees Donate Over 6,400lbs of Food during Scavenger Hunt

They are never here for long, but St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance always appreciates our annual visit from Discover Card. The employees take part in a holiday scavenger hunt and always include a component for helping Arizona hungry in the event.

This year, the event had a Rock Star theme so the five teams arrived in limousines dress as their favorite bands – we recognized KISS and Bon Jovi among those paying us a visit. All the limos were packed with food hurriedly purchased at grocery stores minutes before. And when we weighed what the five teams brought in, more than 6,400 pounds of much-needed food was donated.

We hardly even had a chance to thank them. So we’re doing it now. Thanks Discover Card! Happy Holidays. See you next year!

Kids Cafe in Surprise calls for Volunteers with Grand Opening Approaching on April 7th

Posted: Wednesday, March 30, 2011 1:45 pm

By NORA AVERY-PAGE, DAILY NEWS-SUN | 0 comments

Volunteers from the Sun Cities who devote time to the St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance in Surprise don’t want Arizona children to go to bed hungry.

They see the faces of hunger while others just see statistics:

• One in four children in the state are living in poverty, amounting to more than 260,000 children in Maricopa Country alone.

• In Surprise, nearly 24 percent of households fall at or below the poverty level.

• Arizona ranks dead last in an America’s Health Ranking study with the greatest number of children in poverty.

The St. Mary’s Kids Cafe program is working toward changing those numbers by offering daily meals to impoverished children.

“Child hunger is getting worse,” said Laura Brill, the Kids Cafe manager, calling these statistics “disturbing and unacceptable.”

The program feeds about 1,700 school-age children at 32 different locations every day, but with a new building expansion, Brill hopes to expand that number to 3,000 over the summer and 4,000 by the end of the year.

The program will be moving next week to a renovated former storage space in the westside location of St. Mary’s, so volunteers and staff can pack, store and assemble the meals, which include sandwiches and fruit and vegetables, all in one place.

The volunteers appreciate the commitment to the westside location, said Jan Wells, who helps coordinate the volunteers.

“Everybody is very excited,” she said.

Wells hopes to expand the menu offered. Right now, volunteers make up ham sandwiches, beef and ranch wraps or other varieties of sandwiches.

“Our goal is to provide that nutritional meal,” she said.

Brill said children living in poverty don’t eat well because it’s usually the highly processed foods lacking in significant nutritional value that are the cheapest to buy and that leads not only to poorer general health, but fatigue, hospitalizations, behavioral difficulties and impaired performance in school.

Brill said the goal of the program, which exists on a combination of donations and government funding, is to give children consistent daily nutrition, and it’s about giving them both quantity and quality food.

“This is the future of Arizona, and we feel like we need to invest now,” Brill said.

It’s important to sustain that nutrition during the summer, and more difficult to do because the children aren’t in school, she said.

“We want to kind of keep them steady,” Brill said. “We want the kids to be ready for when school starts back up.”

The goal is to expand the Kids Cafe program to make 8,000 meals a day, but that’s a few years down the road, she said.

And for both the current and future expansion, the food bank needs new volunteers; both Brill and Wells emphasized their appreciation for the volunteers and the support of the Sun Cities and Surprise communities.

But it takes a lot of work, Brill said, stressing the need for volunteers looking for a more in-depth project who can adopt a Kids Cafe site to set up and track the program.

“We want to make sure we’re very mindful in our planning,” Brill said, explaining she doesn’t want to have to say to the children at the sites: “Sorry, we messed up, we’re not going to feed you anymore.”

If the program doesn’t get enough volunteers to visit sites, it can’t have as many locations and won’t be able to feed as many kids, Brill said.

The Kids Cafe program is also looking for potential new locations for the meal sites, which can be any place children have access to, from a church, playground or pool, or an apartment complex.

Volunteers interested in doing site visits can call Grace Rodil at 602-343-5629 or email her at mgrodil@firstfoodbank.org.

For volunteers looking to help prepare meals or do other work for St. Mary’s Westside location, call Jan Wells at 602-343-5637 or reach her by email at jkwells@firstfoodbank.org.

Different sites looking to participate can call Melissa Jensen at 602-647-1820

Pairing Gardens With Food Banks

Demand at food banks has risen sharply due to the economic crisis. But fresh produce can be difficult to keep in stock at these facilities because of its price and limited shelf life. The Arizona Republic reports on one food bank that has started up its own 21-square-foot community vegetable garden this year, a project headed up by a local chef/gardener. We’ve previously covered other produce-to-food-bank initiatives here in Seattle, including a startup program to distribute seeds and gardening advice at food distribution centers, and efforts to collect fruit tree and garden excess for emergency food services.

But one factor that can put distance between fresh vegetables and the neediest people is lack of access to a kitchen. One thing we’d be interested to see: a shared kitchen facility where people without a home can prepare freshly harvested produce from a community garden. Though certainly not as efficient in terms of scale as a community feeding facility like the Langar in Delhi, it seems that a kitchen for preparing food would provide a bit of dignity, stability and choice in the lives of the people who used it. What do you think? (JL)

http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/009786.html

Organization of Non-Profit Executives Awards Terry Shannon with the 2009 Community Partnership Award

St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance President and CEO Terry Shannon was named a Director of the Year during an awards luncheon on March 20 by ONE, the Organization of Non-Profit Executives. Shannon was awarded the Community Partnership Award in recognition of collaboration between the Food Bank, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health and the Arizona Department of Health Services to build a Community Services Campus at the 31st Avenue location.

Opened officially in October 2008, the center was a direct result of close collaboration, led by Shannon, between the three agencies. Now the Community Service Campus offers a federally-directed supplemental nutrition program, WIC, which provides preventive health services and education to women, infants and children most in need, in a new, cheerful, well-designed building that is safe and convenient to the population it serves.

Through a broad network of local partners including the Food Bank, the county and the state, critical services such as breastfeeding support, supplemental meals, emergency food boxes, nutrition and education are available to aid families seeking to get back on their feet and raise healthy children.

“I believe it is a great partnership because both of our organizations, while delivering different products, are working to lift up our community and help those who are having a tough time,” Mr. Shannon said in a letter to Food Bank staff. “Together we deliver ‘hope,’”